tom moody

annotation

prime_clickbait_annotated

- tom moody

January 25th, 2016 at 7:48 pm

Posted in general

sketch_n7

sketch_n7

Drawn with Linux MyPaint and Krita

- tom moody

January 23rd, 2016 at 9:59 am

sketch_n6

sketch_n6

Drawn with Linux MyPaint and Krita

- tom moody

January 23rd, 2016 at 9:59 am

Feedly finally adds email logins

After a couple of years of complaints, the Feedly RSS reader added an email login option, so you no longer have to use Google to access the product.
My list of RSS readers has been updated to reflect this improvement.
Please add the tommoody.us feed to a reader on that list, if you haven't already, and thumb your nose at "Big Social."
(I can actually remember a time when I complained about RSS because it streamlined all the personal quirks out of individual blogs. I mentioned this recently to a honcho at an "art and technology" website and he said, "wait -- you were blogging before RSS?")

- tom moody

January 21st, 2016 at 8:13 am

Posted in general

green arm dream

green_arm_dream640x640

Drawn with Linux MyPaint. This is based on a dream, not of arms but of a painting that looked like this. In the dream there were more arms and they were more geometric, but they were hovering over a field of green squares.

- tom moody

January 19th, 2016 at 12:05 pm

Distributed Gallery catalog (converted to epub)

In 2009, The Distributed Gallery in Los Angeles printed a small book to accompany my show there.
A PDF version was posted by Sean Dockray, who ran the gallery. This disappeared for awhile but Dockray has reposted it. As an experiment/learning adventure I converted the PDF to epub using Sigil. I've attempted to contact Dockray a few times but as of yet this epub isn't "official." I'm posting it as personal documentation and giving full credits to Dockray and others, as shown in the front matter of the book.

telic_cover

Some notes on the epub conversion:
Calibre converts the PDF to epub, consisting of an HTML file and images. Editing the HTML and CSS is very similar to a working on web pages. Sigil has a WYSIWYG editor that can be used for this. I broke the single large HTML file into sections to facilitate creating a table of contents. Sigil generates the ToC automatically and that file can be edited separately.
The only thing really laborious was the images. I sized them at 600 pixels wide and added captions as part of the image. This required making screenshots and finding the right font size to be legible in an e-reader.
To test the epub I viewed it in Calibre, in a Kobo e-reader, and in Adobe Digital Editions. Calibre converts the epub to .mobi without any hitches, but it makes the images resizable in a way I don't care for much, so I'm not posting a mobi version.

Some notes on the book:
The interviews and selected blog commentary reflect a certain status quo at the end of the blogosphere era, before the complete hegemony of Facebook as a place for artists. :(
Much of the discussion centers on "showing the blog in the gallery" and "showing GIFs in the gallery," ideas that were later picked up and/or repackaged by others under the banner of so-called post-internet art. It's kind of a time capsule, even though I'm still doing most of the same things online and in galleries. The main improvement I have to report is that a used Amazon Fire tablet makes a much better GIF display device than burning DVDs.

- tom moody

January 18th, 2016 at 8:44 am

Posted in art - tm

exhibit

exhibit_500w

From my distant past, this image, digitally reconstructed from an old photo negative.
A law student friend needed a jury exhibit for a mock trial. In the case, a supermarket shopper rolled her cart over a steel plate in a shopping lane, upsetting the cart and causing personal injury. The plate covered pipes in the floor, and was not bolted down but rested on an inner lip of metal.
The negligence suit hinged on such factors as (i) whether a warning sign should have been placed in the aisle, (ii) whether the plate had the appearance of solidity, and (iii) whether a prudent shopper would have proceeded to roll a cart across the plate.
I made this "jury visualization aid" with ink and zip-a-tone on a large piece of illustration board. I watched the trial from the spectator seats, and when this drawing was pulled out and placed before the jury, the professor monitoring the proceedings exclaimed, "that looks like something from a modern art exhibit."
In real life, an insurer would probably have settled the case. This exhibit was ultimately not very helpful to either the plaintiff or the defense, and it's a measure of its ambiguity that I can't recall which side I was supposed to be be assisting, or who prevailed. The top two panels make the steel plate's placement appear precarious, undermining the more solid impression in the bottom panel.

- tom moody

January 17th, 2016 at 10:32 am

Hyo Myoung Kim

hyo_myoung_kim_detail

...is currently doing a digital residency at Gazell.io (the online space for London's Gazelli Art House gallery), where I'm scheduled to put work up in March.
You can launch Hyo Myoung Kim's show from the artist page. (I also like Laura Brothers' work).
His is glitched-out 3D painting, some animated and some not. One thing I've noticed is the gallery page resizes images to a standard format, so most of his work would occupy more screen space if it was the true size. The files are also large and load slowly, although animations such as this 19 MB gif are worth the wait. Transparentization of all the layers of these complex tangles of digital vermicelli gives a sensual, time-lapse effect. The seductive qualities would be lost if the file was any smaller.

- tom moody

January 14th, 2016 at 9:20 am

Posted in art - others

another (flawed) anti-smartphone testimonial

Here's another person -- an executive at a Silicon Valley start-up, no less! -- who has written an article about how he doesn't have a smartphone. Always good to read (more potential catechism-like phraseology):

I was on my bike, cycling to Stanford, and it struck me that a week had gone by without my having a phone. And everything was just fine. Better than fine, actually. I felt more relaxed, carefree, happier.

But then the confession falls apart when Mr. Silicon Valley admits he uses a friend's phone five times a month, to call... Uber!

This would be like a person in the '90s saying "I don't have a TV but I do knock on my neighbor's door five times a month and ask if I can watch my 'Faces of Death' video."

Just get a burner phone and call a cab, is that so hard? But we'll take what we can get, alternative lifestyle-wise.

- tom moody

January 14th, 2016 at 8:40 am

Posted in computers-R-stupid

Lovink on social media alternatives

A new Geert Lovink interview has been posted on his site, expressing his ongoing struggle to imagine alternatives to iPhone/Facebook zombie culture. The Q&A below is "curmudgeonly" but still should be read aloud daily, like a church catechism:

Q: Why are you critical of the regular social network sites (SNS)?

A: Because I am part of a generation that fought for decentralized networks, an open internet in which the user wasn’t just a consumer of some product. Developments of the past ten or so years have meant that regular social media users have traded a lot of the earlier complexities and freedom [for] simplicity and speed.

And at the end of the church service, parishioners would read these words of Lovink's in unison, before filing out of their pews:

It is my dream that Facebook will close shop as soon as possible, preferably because its users massively walk away and abandon the service. I am saying this because such sudden exoduses have happened in the past. Amen. [Amen added --tm]

The stumbling block is alternatives. Lovink mentions homegrown attempts at Facebook such as Lorea, Diaspora, Friendica, Crabgrass, and Unlike Us. These are terrible names and that's half the problem. Who says we need another "scalable" connection service? Forums exist all over the web, to this day, for specialized discussion, and there are myriad ways to have conversations using the Net without crawling up Mark Zuckerberg's bum.
Lovink also bemoans "the (conceptual) stagnation of Linux." That may or may not be true, but he shouldn't shrug off that new-ish companies (such as Think Penguin) make it possible for non-geeks to have PCs and laptops that aren't running Windows or the Apple OS. One doesn't have to be "part of a generation that fought for decentralized networks" to appreciate their value. Lovink mentions TOR as an alternative browser; that's a subject for another post but suffice it to say, short of that, there are other ways to increase privacy from ISP and advertiser snooping, such as VPNs, that anyone can install.
The solution is individual choices. Or small groups, making use of available resources. As opposed to another "top down" site that "brings people together."

- tom moody

January 13th, 2016 at 9:05 am

Posted in computers-R-stupid