tom moody

Archive for the ‘art – others’ Category

LP and commentary

deeppurple

deeppurple_label

Images and commentary via Discogs:

drunk_DP2

- tom moody

April 18th, 2017 at 11:37 am

censorship, 1970s-style

Going through the Discogs database recalled this racy LP cover (how could anyone forget this?):

That was briefly in stores in the US, but by the end of the year (1974) the "censored version" appeared:

Kind of eerie! If you're concerned about a transgressive female image, don't use half-measures. Just show some trees. This was decades before the erased-in-Photoshop genre appeared (e.g. removing the victims of the Kent State shooting using the "clone tool") so it seems almost presciently eerie.

- tom moody

April 17th, 2017 at 10:32 am

elise ferguson print

Elise Ferguson
Double A
14" x 11", pigmented plaster on paper
Signed edition of 20

The edition was already sold by the time I looked at the press release. I might have shelled out!
According to the print dealer, Exhibition A, "to create Double A, Ferguson ... directly silkscreen[ed] pigmented plaster onto coldpress paper, the [same] process [used] when creating her larger body of work." It's a handsome image, jpeg-ishly speaking. I haven't seen Ferguson's work IRL in quite a few years but it was always materially tasty and historically smart. In this instance she looks back to Louis Kahn and "concrete as a primary medium," with her plaster standing in, symbolically, for the Kahn-crete.

- tom moody

April 12th, 2017 at 12:24 am

Posted in art - others

drawing, from daniel albright memorial

Just learned that one of my favorite teachers, Daniel Albright, died a couple of years ago.
A memorial with readings, music, and reminiscences was posted: [YouTube]
The drawing comes from a series of pictures projected on the auditorium screen, interpreting a passage from one of Albright's books. (It reminds me a bit of Erika Somogyi's work)
I'll have more to say about him -- I just ordered a few of his tomes that I hadn't read yet. I've plugged him a few times on the blahg over the years.
Several of the reminiscers describe him as a genius and there's really no other word. When he lectured he held you spellbound -- you could feel your brain expanding.
In his younger years (when I had him as an undergrad advisor and my brain was still expanding) he primarily focused on English lit. He was in his mid-20s when he wrote a book on "Yeats' creative imagination in old age." That's one I ordered -- I've always been curious about it but never found it in a library or bookstore.
Gradually he broadened his criticism to include music and painting. At the end of his life his focus was interdisciplinary studies. His pursuits took him from Virginia to Rochester to (after 2003) Harvard, whether I gather his courses were popular.
I like his writing on poetry and music and modernist theory in general. I don't really care much about the interrelationships of the arts but appreciated that he would also take the flip side of the argument, explaining why and when it was good for a discipline to remain entrenched in its area of competence (to use a phrase of Greenberg's, a critic he admired but didn't agree with).
An astute Am*zon commenter said, regarding Albright's last book Putting Modernism Together: "A great project but this original and talented thinker is finally unable to let go of the canon." You could do a lot worse having someone to explain the canon to you, but the frustration isn't with Albright's conservatism so much as it is selfishly wanting to see that brilliant mind probing outside the established greats.

- tom moody

April 9th, 2017 at 8:11 am

Posted in art - others, books, theory

dump.fm memorial, part 3

The creator of the shabby-chic meme above, Chris Duncan, quit dumping long before Dump.fm died but this makes a nice memorial. Duncan went on to an excellent career as a Vine troll, harassing random urbanites and uploading their reactions. E.g., "You ride your motorcycle like a real weenie!" Duncan's dump memes were noteworthy for being made in MSPaint and saved as degraded jpegs. This one is missing the characteristic artifacts. The football jersey font was typical.

- tom moody

February 27th, 2017 at 9:09 am

milutis dump.fm essay comments

stage-idgiupset

Comments to Joe Milutis' Hyperallergic article on Dump.fm slowly trickle in (hat tip stage for upset "I Don't Get It Guy"):

sara • 15 days ago

Rene sucks d*nkey d*ck [asterisks in the original --tm]

Ross L. Gould • 2 days ago

No mention of deal with it??? Did you ever even dump bro?

tom moody • 11 hours ago

Thanks to Joe Milutis for this eulogy. Dump is hard to write about, and anyone who attempts to nail the experience risks becoming the IDGI Guy (a grumpy stock photo actor who, in real life, was one of the first people not to get Dump -- he and the photographer complained loudly until Jeanette Hayes painted IDGI Guy's portrait in oils -- then they got it). In fact, every dumper thinks they "get it" and will greet another's theories with sllence or abuse, hence this comment section. I said to one dumper that "Rene sucks d*nkey d*ck" was kind of a lame response and the dumper said the comment was "probably about the aspects of dump Milutis forgot to mention or couldn't fit in." And I said, "You're reading a lot into 'Rene sucks d*nkey d*ck.'"

tom moody • 5 minutes ago

And as for not covering "deal with it," the answer is -- [slowly descending sunglasses] -- "deal with it."

- tom moody

February 22nd, 2017 at 6:23 am

IDGI_ROZENDAAL

IDGI_ROZENDAAL

IDGI Guy, posted by ryder on dump.fm

- tom moody

February 22nd, 2017 at 6:23 am

Joe Milutis Eulogizes Dump.fm

On Hyperallergic, Joe Milutis discusses the recently-deceased website Dump.fm, in an essay titled In Memory of Dump.fm: An Endlessly Collaborative Image Poem.

Neither an art-world-ish “internet surf club” nor a monetized zeitgeist sump pump, dump seemed to harken back to a pre-1997 internet era, when it was possible to imagine that the users you met online were a small enough cohort to seem communitarian, but not large enough to merely replicate the social structures and hierarchies of the world at large.

Milutis' treatment of the site as a poetic language is appreciated:

Weird fragments, heavy dithering, pieces of images or text floating without context. Inaction gifs as opposed to reaction gifs. The quasi-syntactical combinations of these crappy objects were only possible if participants were more interested in treating the combinations like a language — one for which they would both have to amass the vocabulary and then be willing to speak with it. The rapidity of these combinations allowed for the unexpected, as if Breton’s automatic writing had finally found its imagistic counterpart.

Milutis avoids the political in discussing the Rene Abythe GIF below, except in the sense of dump-vs-tumblr politics and dump's intriguing disconnections with the rest of the world ("real" or online). For the record, it depicts Hillary Clinton's "pointing to the right and the red" logo crudely morphing into the Outback Steakhouse logo. (Electors asked Where's the Beef and gave us Trump.) The geek joke is that that the red arrow, when compressed, becomes a jagged outline resembling that familiar outdoors-y mountain range, helpfully rotated so we can see it.

- tom moody

February 7th, 2017 at 6:34 am

albert oehlen (2017)

Untitled (Baum 84), 2016, oil on ​dibond, 98 7/16 × 98 7/16 inches © Albert Oehlen. Photo by Stefan Rohner.

The Gagosian empire sent this image in a press release email -- tasty! At least, as a jpeg.
The show opens Feb 26 in the 21st Street space.
The paintings are big, in case your second loft needs wall hangings.
There was a time when Oehlen was a bad boy, sigh.

- tom moody

February 2nd, 2017 at 2:19 pm

Posted in art - others

utopia and dystopia in architecture (a capsule)

Louise Belcourt, Mound #28, 2015, oil on canvas, 66 x 85 inches

Will likely not make it to Locks Gallery in Philadelphia for Louise Belcourt's show so this is a "jpeg review."

The recent film Midnight Special, a leaner, meaner version of John Carpenter's Starman [caution: spoilers], imagines a race of perfected humans in a dimension "above" ours, who "have watched us for years." At the end of the movie we're given a glimpse of their architecture, very tech-y, CAD-designed, eco-friendly structures twisting and soaring above the landscape. Belcourt's urban vision above, for me, better approximates what an evolved humanity might build. Kinder, gentler, more integrated and integral than the film's Eiffel-meets-Saarinen machine confections.

On the other side of the design-wheel, opposite Belcourt's mound cities of neopolitan ice cream but not that far off from some of Midnight Special's skyscraper para-buildings, we have this clanking artifact from the real world, spotted by James Howard Kunstler (fortunately not yet built -- this is only a rendering -- but awaiting city approvals -- in Los Angeles -- near the airport):

Friendly aliens, if you are watching us, please intervene now.

- tom moody

January 9th, 2017 at 8:33 am